Cpanel and Other Ports

cPanel

cPanel 2082
cPanel – SSL 2083
WHM 2086
WHM – SSL 2087
Webmail 2095
Webmail – SSL 2096
Email

POP3 110
POP3 – SSL 995
IMAP 143
IMAP – SSL 993
SMTP 25
SMTP Alternate 26
SMTP Alternate 587
SMTP – SSL 465
Web

HTTP 80
SSL 443
FTP 21
FTPs 990
SFTP 22
SFTP Shared/Reseller Servers 2222
Webdisk 2077
Webdisk – SSL 2078
MySQL 3306
MSSQL 1433
SSH 22
SSH Shared/Reseller Servers 2222
Other

Plesk Control Panel 8880
Plesk Control Panel – SSL 8443
Plesk Linux Webmail N/A*
Plesk Windows Webmail (SmarterMail) 9998**
Virtuozzo 4643
DotNet Panel 9001
DotNet Panel Login 80
RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) 4489

How To Create SSH Keys With PuTTY to Connect to CentOS7

Generating OpenSSH-compatible Keys for Use with PuTTY

To generate a set of RSA keys with PuTTYgen:

  1. Start the PuTTYgen utility, by double-clicking on its .exe file;
  2. For Type of key to generate, select RSA;
  3. In the Number of bits in a generated key field, specify either 2048 or 4096 (increasing the bits makes it harder to crack the key by brute-force methods);
  4. Click the Generate button;
  5. Move your mouse pointer around in the blank area of the Key section, below the progress bar (to generate some randomness) until the progress bar is full;
  6. A private/ public key pair has now been generated;
  7. In the Key comment field, enter any comment you’d like, to help you identify this key pair, later (e.g. your e-mail address; home; office; etc.) — the key comment is particularly useful in the event you end up creating more than one key pair;
  8. Optional: Type a passphrase in the Key passphrase field & re-type the same passphrase in the Confirm passphrase field (if you would like to use your keys for automated processes, however, you should not create a passphrase);
  9. Click the Save public key button & choose whatever filename you’d like (some users create a folder in their computer named my_keys);
  10. Click the Save private key button & choose whatever filename you’d like (you can save it in the same location as the public key, but it should be a location that only you can access and that you will NOT lose! If you lose your keys and have disabled username/password logins, you will no longer be able log in!);
  11. Right-click in the text field labeled Public key for pasting into OpenSSH authorized_keys file and choose Select All;
    Right-click again in the same text field and choose Copy.
  12. NOTE: PuTTY and OpenSSH use different formats for public SSH keys. If the SSH Key you copied starts with “—- BEGIN SSH2 PUBLIC KEY …”, it is in the wrong format. Be sure to follow the instructions carefully. Your key should start with “ssh-rsa AAAA ….”
  13. Save The Public Key On The Server

Now, you need to paste the copied public key in the file ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on your server.

Log in to your destination server; see How to Log Into Your Droplet with PuTTY (for windows users)
If your SSH folder does not yet exist, create it manually:

mkdir ~/.ssh
chmod 0700 ~/.ssh
touch ~/.ssh/authorized_keys
chmod 0644 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys

Paste the SSH public key into your ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file (see Installing and Using the Vim Text Editor on an Cloud Server):

nano ~/.ssh/authorized_keys

  1. Create a PuTTY Profile to Save Your Server’s Settings
    In PuTTY, you can create (and save) profiles for connections to your various SSH servers, so you don’t have to remember, and continually re-type, redundant information.
  2. Start PuTTY by double-clicking its executable file;
  3. PuTTY’s initial window is the Session Category (navigate PuTTY’s various categories, along the left-hand side of the window);
  4. In the Host Name field, enter the IP address of your VPS or its fully qualified domain name (FQDN);
  5. Enter the port number in the Port field (for added security, consider changing your server’s SSH port to a non-standard port.
  6. Select SSH under Protocol;
  7. Along the left-hand side of the window, select the Data sub-category, under Connection;
  8. Specify the username that you plan on using, when logging in to the SSH server, and whose profile you’re saving, in the Auto-login username field;
  9. Expand the SSH sub-category, under Connection;
  10. Highlight the Auth sub-category and click the Browse button, on the right-hand side of the PuTTY window;
  11. Browse your file system and select your previously-created private key;
  12. Return to the Session Category and enter a name for this profile in the Saved Sessions field, e.g. user@123.456.78.9 or user@host.yourdomain.tld;
  13. Click the Save button for the Load, Save or Delete a stored session area.
  14. Now you can go ahead and log in to user@1.2.3.4 and you will not be prompted for a password. However, if you had set a passphrase on your public key, you will be asked to enter the passphrase at that time (and every time you log in, in the future).

Disable Username/Password Logins

Once you have verified that your key-based logins are working, you may elect to disable username/password logins to achieve better security. To do this, you need to edit your SSH server’s configuration file. On Debian/ Ubuntu systems, this file is located at /etc/ssh/sshd_config.


nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Tap the i key on your keyboard and edit the lines, referenced below:


[...]
PasswordAuthentication no
[...]
UsePAM no
[...]

To save, tap the following keys on your keyboard (in this order): Esc, :, w, q, Enter. Now, reload the SSH server’s configuration:


sudo reload ssh

Categories SSH

Install vmware tools on CentOS 7 VM

Install the opem-vm-tools:

# yum install open-vm-tools
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
 * base: repos.dfw.quadranet.com
 * epel: mirrors.develooper.com
 * extras: mirror.chpc.utah.edu
 * updates: mirror.chpc.utah.edu
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package open-vm-tools.x86_64 0:10.1.5-3.el7 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: xmlsec1-openssl for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: pciutils for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: net-tools for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libfuse.so.2(FUSE_2.6)(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libfuse.so.2(FUSE_2.5)(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: fuse for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libxmlsec1.so.1()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libmspack.so.0()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libicuuc.so.50()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libicui18n.so.50()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libicudata.so.50()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libfuse.so.2()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libdnet.so.1()(64bit) for package: open-vm-tools-10.1.5-3.el7.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package fuse.x86_64 0:2.9.2-8.el7 will be installed
---> Package fuse-libs.x86_64 0:2.9.2-8.el7 will be installed
---> Package libdnet.x86_64 0:1.12-13.1.el7 will be installed
---> Package libicu.x86_64 0:50.1.2-15.el7 will be installed
---> Package libmspack.x86_64 0:0.5-0.5.alpha.el7 will be installed
---> Package net-tools.x86_64 0:2.0-0.22.20131004git.el7 will be installed
---> Package pciutils.x86_64 0:3.5.1-2.el7 will be installed
---> Package xmlsec1.x86_64 0:1.2.20-7.el7_4 will be installed
---> Package xmlsec1-openssl.x86_64 0:1.2.20-7.el7_4 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

================================================================================================================================================
 Package                             Arch                       Version                                       Repository                   Size
================================================================================================================================================
Installing:
 open-vm-tools                       x86_64                     10.1.5-3.el7                                  base                        663 k
Installing for dependencies:
 fuse                                x86_64                     2.9.2-8.el7                                   base                         85 k
 fuse-libs                           x86_64                     2.9.2-8.el7                                   base                         93 k
 libdnet                             x86_64                     1.12-13.1.el7                                 base                         31 k
 libicu                              x86_64                     50.1.2-15.el7                                 base                        6.9 M
 libmspack                           x86_64                     0.5-0.5.alpha.el7                             base                         64 k
 net-tools                           x86_64                     2.0-0.22.20131004git.el7                      base                        305 k
 pciutils                            x86_64                     3.5.1-2.el7                                   base                         93 k
 xmlsec1                             x86_64                     1.2.20-7.el7_4                                updates                     177 k
 xmlsec1-openssl                     x86_64                     1.2.20-7.el7_4                                updates                      76 k

Transaction Summary
================================================================================================================================================
Install  1 Package (+9 Dependent packages)

Total download size: 8.4 M
Installed size: 29 M

Reboot the server:

# shutdown -r now

Install with with the Vmware CD:

Login to ESXi.

Select the VM from the Virtual Machine list.

Click the actions wheel for the warning message:

Select Guest OS > Install Vmware Tools

Run the mount command with no arguments to determine whether your Linux distribution automatically mounted the VMware Tools virtual CD-ROM image.

If the CD-ROM device is mounted, the CD-ROM device and its mount point are listed as something like this:

/dev/cdrom on /mnt/cdrom type iso9660 (ro,nosuid,nodev)

If the VMware Tools virtual CD-ROM image is not mounted, mount the CD-ROM drive.

If a mount point directory does not already exist, create it.

# mkdir /mnt/cdrom

Some Linux distributions use different mount point names. For example, on some distributions the mount point is /media/VMware Tools rather than /mnt/cdrom. Modify the command to reflect the conventions that your distribution uses.

Mount the CD-ROM drive.

# mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom

Some Linux distributions use different device names or organize the /dev directory differently. If your CD-ROM drive is not /dev/cdrom or if the mount point for a CD-ROM is not /mnt/cdrom, modify the command to reflect the conventions that your distribution uses.

Change to a working directory (for example, /tmp).

# cd /tmp

Delete any previous vmware-tools-distrib directory before you install VMware Tools. The location of this directory depends on where you placed it during the previous installation. Often this directory is placed in /tmp/vmware-tools-distrib.

List the contents of the mount point directory and note the filename of the VMware Tools tar installer.

#  ls /mnt/cdrom/
manifest.txt  run_upgrader.sh  VMwareTools-10.1.0-4449150.tar.gz  vmware-tools-upgrader-32  vmware-tools-upgrader-64

Uncompress the installer.

# tar zxpf /mnt/cdrom/VMwareTools-10.1.0-4449150.tar.gz

The value x.x.x is the product version number, and yyyy is the build number of the product release.

If you attempt to install a tar installation over an RPM installation, or the reverse, the installer detects the previous installation and must convert the installer database format before continuing.

If necessary, unmount the CD-ROM image.

# umount /dev/cdrom 

If your Linux distribution automatically mounted the CD-ROM, you do not need to unmount the image.

Run the installer and configure VMware Tools.

cd vmware-tools-distrib
./vmware-install.pl
open-vm-tools packages are available from the OS vendor and VMware recommends
using open-vm-tools packages. See http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2073803 for more
information.

Usually, the vmware-config-tools.pl configuration file runs after the installer file finishes running. Respond to the prompts by pressing Enter to accept the default values, if appropriate for your configuration. Follow the instructions at the end of the script.

Depending on the features you use, these instructions can include restarting the X session, restarting networking, logging in again, and starting the VMware User process. You can alternatively reboot the guest operating system to accomplish all these tasks.

If you are using vCenter Server, the VMware Tools label on the Summary tab changes to OK.

Changing File Ownership in Windows

Taking Ownership of Files and Folders in Windows Server. Here are some notes on how to do this:

If you are an administrator, an authorized user, or a backup operator, you can take ownership of a file or folder by completing the following steps:
1. In Windows Explorer, open the file or folder’s Properties dialog box by right-clicking the file or folder and then clicking Properties.
2. On the Security tab, click Advanced to display the Advanced Security Settings dialog box.
3. On the Owner tab, click Edit.This opens the Advanced Security Settings dialog box for editing.
4. In the Change Owner To list, select the new owner.If you’re taking ownership of a folder, you can take ownership of all subfolders and files within the folder by selecting the Replace Owner On Subcontainers And Objects option.
5. Click OK twice when you have finished.

Assigning Ownership
If you are an administrator or the current owner of a file, you can assign ownership of a file or a folder to another user or group by completing these steps:
1. In Windows Explorer, open the file or folder’s Properties dialog box by right-clicking the file or folder and then clicking Properties.
2. On the Security tab, click Advanced to display the Advanced Security Settings dialog box.
3. On the Owner tab, click Edit. This opens the Advanced Security Settings dialog box for editing.
4. Click Other Users Or Groups to display the Select User, Computer, Service Account, Or Group dialog box.
5. Type the name of a user or a group, and then click Check Names. If multiple names match the value you entered, you’ll see a list of names and can choose the one you want to use. Otherwise, the name will be filled in for you, and you can click OK to close the Select User, Computer, Service Account, Or Group dialog box.
6. In the Change Owner To list, select the new owner. If you’re assigning ownership of a folder, you can assign ownership of all subfolders and files within the folder by selecting the Replace Owner On Subcontainers And Objects option.
7. Click OK twice when you have finished.
Codero

Copy files from Windows Desktop to Server with Robocopy

Robocopy

Robocopy (Robust File Copy) is a command-line file copying tool included with the Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit, free to licensed users of Windows. The tool, as with much of the resource kit, works under Windows XP as well as under the Windows Server platform.

Download Robocopy Command Line Tool for Windows 2003 and 2008 Server / Windows XP / Vista / 7
Please visit Microsoft web site to download Robocopy (rktools.exe – 11.8M). It is part of Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=17657

GUI Tools:

Robocopy GUI is a free GUI frontend to the robocopy command.
RichCopy is a free new utility which offers a number of improvements over Robocopy GUI.

Verify the speed of my Network Cards in Linux

How to tell the network speed of network cards in Linux?

CentOS 7

Find the network cards:

ip addr
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN qlen 1
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: ens160: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:0c:29:d5:dc:4a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 216.55.xxx.xxx/24 brd 216.55.169.255 scope global ens160
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::20c:29ff:fed5:dc4a/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: ens192: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:0c:29:d5:dc:54 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.1.101/24 brd 192.168.1.255 scope global ens192
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::20c:29ff:fed5:dc54/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

Ethtool

# ethtool ens160
Settings for ens160:
        Supported ports: [ TP ]
        Supported link modes:   1000baseT/Full
                                10000baseT/Full
        Supported pause frame use: No
        Supports auto-negotiation: No
        Advertised link modes:  Not reported
        Advertised pause frame use: No
        Advertised auto-negotiation: No
        Speed: 10000Mb/s
        Duplex: Full
        Port: Twisted Pair
        PHYAD: 0
        Transceiver: internal
        Auto-negotiation: off
        MDI-X: Unknown
        Supports Wake-on: uag
        Wake-on: d
        Link detected: yes

# ethtool ens160 | grep Speed
        Speed: 10000Mb/s

Script:

for i in $(netstat -i | cut -f1 -d" " | tail -n+3) ; do echo "$i: $(ethtool "$i" | grep Speed | sed 's/Speed://g')" ; done
cat /sys/class/net/<interface>/speed
# cat /sys/class/net/ens160/speed
10000

Above would be in MB.

DMESG

# dmesg |grep eth0
[0.932304] vmxnet3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: NIC Link is Up 10000 Mbps

Check Raid Controller on Linux and Monitor RAID

How to check the raid controller on Linux:

# lspci | grep -i raid
01:00.0 RAID bus controller: LSI Logic / Symbios Logic MegaRAID SAS 2208 [Thunderbolt] (rev 05)

Monitoring Tools

/proc/mdstat
You should get to know /proc/mdstat, looking at it often. This will tell you the state of your arrays, and very importantly it will tell you whether any drives have failed, and whether any arrays are degraded. Check, and check regularly!

xosview
xosview is a venerable utility, and one of the author’s favourites. It is capable of displaying the state of raid arrays, but unfortunately currently the code is broken – it reads mdstat, and doesn’t understand the current output. It is currently (2016) being updated to read the status directly from /sys, and should hopefully soon be able to display raid status correctly. The author leaves xosview running permanently on his desktop to provide an overview of system performance.

mdadm
mdadm –monitor –scan –mail a@b.co.uk
This will fire up mdadm to keep an eye on your arrays. It will daemonize and run in the background, sending an email to the specified address if it detects any problems related to a disk failure. This is good for remote monitoring BUT. It won’t tell you if anything goes wrong with the monitoring! You cannot assume – even if you put this in your boot-up sequence as you should – that you will be notified about important events. It’s not unknown for the daemon to fail.

Don’t rely on this! Check regularly on a manual basis!

smartctl
This tool tells you all sorts of information about your drives. When you read the “When things go wrogn” section, you will see that smartctl is a very important diagnostic tool, but it also provides a lot of proactive information to help you anticipate a drive failure.

There are various S.M.A.R.T. stats that can be looked at which will provide clues:

Attribute | Description |
SMART 5 | Reallocated Sectors Count |
SMART 187 | Reported Uncorrectable Errors |
SMART 188 | Command Timeout |
SMART 197 | Current Pending Sector Timeout |
SMART 198 | Uncorrectable Sector Count |
Backblaze.com (who run huge raid arrays) have a lot of interesting information on their site. They point out that maybe a quarter of their drives fail when all these statistics are 0, so a healthy SMART report does not necessarily mean a healthy drive, but almost none of their drives survive having errors on all five counts.

smartctl also reports on things like drive temperature, how long the drive has been powered on, how many times it has been started and shut down etc. It’s no surprise that drives that get too hot or are otherwise stressed beyond normal limits tend to fail early.

Smartmontools for RAID

https://www.smartmontools.org/wiki/Supported_RAID-Controllers

Check Mail Port Connections with netstat

A good way to check the connectons to mail ports is to use netstat:

# netstat -anp | grep :25
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:25              0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      2170/master
tcp6       0      0 :::25                   :::*                    LISTEN      2170/master
# netstat -anp | grep :465
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:465             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      2170/master
tcp6       0      0 :::465                  :::*                    LISTEN      2170/master
# netstat -anp | grep :587
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:587             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      2170/master
tcp6       0      0 :::587                  :::*                    LISTEN      2170/master

Let’s Encrypt for Windows Server 2012 R2

I recently added MailEnable to a Windows server and wanted to add SSL. I checked and there is an application that you can use to add the Let’s Encrypt SSL.

Quick Start
Download from https://certifytheweb.com/ and install it.
Click ‘New Certificate’, choose your IIS site (which must have 1 or more hostname bindings set). Save your settings and click ‘Request Certificate’
All done!